Research on: (i) COSMOS cloud connected vehicles, (ii) Monitoring of traffic intersections, using bird’s eye cameras, supported by ultra-low latency computational/communications hubs; (iii) Simultaneous video-based tracking of cars and pedestrians, and prediction of movement based on long-term observations of the intersection; (iv) Real-time computational processing, using deep learning, utilizing GPUs, in support of COSMOS applications; (v) Sub-10ms latency communication between all vehicles and the edge cloud computational/communication hub, to be used in support of autonomous vehicle navigation. The research is performed using the pilot node of project COSMOS infrastructure.

Continue reading

Our goal is to use deep learning networks to understand which neurons in the brain encode fine motor movements in mice. We collected large datasets entailing calcium imaging data of active neurons and high-resolution videos when mice perform motor tasks. We want to use recent advances in deep learning to (1) estimate the poses of mouse body parts at a high spatiotemporal resolution (2) extract behaviorally-relevant information and (3) align them with neural activity data. Behavioral video analysis is made possible by transfer learning, the ability to take a network that was trained on a task with a large supervised dataset and utilize it on a small supervised dataset. This has been used e.g. in a human pose–estimation algorithm called DeeperCut. Recently, such algorithms were tailored for use in the laboratory in a Python-based toolbox known as DeepLabCut, providing a tool for high-throughput behavioral video analysis.

Continue reading

The function for much of the 3 billion letters in the human genome remain to be understood. Advances in DNA sequencing technology have generated enormous amount of data, yet we don’t have the tool to extract rules of how the genome works. Deep learning holds great potential in decoding the genome, in particular due to the digital nature of DNA sequences and the ability to handle large data sets. However, like many other applications, the interpretability of deep learning models hampers its ability to help understand the genome. We are developing deep learning architectures embedded with the principles of gene regulation and we will be leveraging billions of existing measurements of gene activity to learn a mechanistic model of gene regulation in human cells.

Continue reading

This project will be focused on creating a deep learning framework for tracking individual molecules and proteins as they move within a cell under various conditions. Using total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy, we have accumulated more than 10 million trajectories over dozens of experimental preparations with differences in both the imaging approaches as well as the biological context. In our experiments we have captured particles under a wide variety of conditions including increased protein expression level, and a range of drug concentrations. Our biggest challenge is being able to stably track the movement of a particle as it passes by other particles or groups of particles, and to do this in a way that generalizes over novel conditions. The Data Science Institute Scholar chosen for this project would work with scientists in the Javitch laboratory and others across the Columbia campus to conceive of an approach for efficiently and effectively tracking particles. The resulting work would be of great interest to an increasing number of scientists working in this field who currently rely on methods based on feature engineering that are often inaccurate or inflexible compared to modern deep learning methods.

Continue reading

Big data with temporal dependence brings unique challenges in effective prediction and data analysis. The complex high-dimensional interactions between observations in such data brings unique challenges which standard off-the-shelf machine learning algorithms cannot handle. Even basic tasks of clustering, visualization and identification of recurring patterns are difficult.

Continue reading

A central issue facing systems neuroscience is defining the rich naturalistic behavioral repertoire that mice engage in under psychiatrically relevant situations. Recent advances in deep learning (e.g., DeepLabCut) have made frame by frame detailed pose estimation possible. However, this dense behavioral data requires new techniques for defining the ethogram (full description of behavior). To date, researchers have used frequency based time series approaches to tackle this problem, with significant limitations. An alternative approach would be to take advantage of new topology methods (persistent homology and directed algebraic topology) to characterize the shapes formed by mouse limb trajectories. Such an approach would have broad application in systems neuroscience. For this project, the student will use machine learning to label animal body parts, then topology to characterize the ethogram and compare the results to existing approaches.

Continue reading

The function for much of the 3 billion letters in the human genome remain to be understood. Advances in DNA sequencing technology have generated enormous amount of data, yet we don’t have the tool to extract rules of how the genome works. Deep learning holds great potential in decoding the genome, in particular due to the digital nature of DNA sequences and the ability to handle large data sets. However, like many other applications, the interpretability of deep learning models hampers its ability to help understand the genome. We are developing deep learning architectures embedded with the principles of gene regulation and we will be leveraging millions of existing whole genome measurements of gene activity to learn a mechanistic model of gene regulation in human cells.

Continue reading

Author's picture

Columbia Data Science Institute (DSI) Scholars Program

The DSI Scholars Program is to engage and support undergraduate and master students in participating data science related research with Columbia faculty. The program’s unique enrichment activities will foster a learning and collaborative community in data science at Columbia.

Columbia University DSI

New York, NY